irismumbles

Found favorites from my time guzzling on images and information on the net.

omgthatdress:

Tiara
2nd half of the 19th century
Sotheby’s

omgthatdress:

Tiara

2nd half of the 19th century

Sotheby’s

photojojo:

Ladies and gentlemen, prepare to be awestruck. 

Photographer Vincent Brady spent an entire summer creating this mesmerizing time lapse of fireflies in Missouri. 

You’ve Never Seen Fireflies Like This

via i09

kateoplis:

Don’t Fret, reflect.

kateoplis:

Happy Monday.

(Source: thelastdraegon)

vitrea-inmensidad:

Kunstformen der Natur (Art forms in Nature) 1899-1904-Ernst Haeckel (Germany)

(via scientificillustration)

christinaodonovan:

Whale Facts. Just because.

christinaodonovan:

Whale Facts. Just because.

(via sosuperawesome)

eschergirls:

nadadoll:

figure 1: head drawings by Andrew Loomis, 1956

figure 2: women’s head designs can be generated by the same methods, they don’t have to all look very nearly the same

Some food for thought for drawing women and avoiding drawing a single female face.  Too often artists seem to be afraid to give women big noses or lines or other distinguishing features, and we end up with the same face on all the characters.  I’ve been browsing a lot of genderswap art lately and I’ve noticed that when male characters with large noses, thin faces, wrinkles, or other features get genderswapped, they tend to end up with small noses, round faces, and no wrinkles, and they no longer look distinct (they also look much younger than the original).  So, just some references and a reminder that women’s faces have all sorts of different features, and you don’t need to just have small cute features with no wrinkles to have a character look female.

devincastro:

Astrophysicist Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson was asked in an interview with TIME magazine:
"What is the most astounding fact you can share with us about the Universe?"

This is his answer.

“[…] So that when I look up at the night sky and I know that yes, we are part of this universe, we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up – many people feel small because they’re small and the Universe is big – but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars. There’s a level of connectivity. That’s really what you want in life, you want to feel connected, you want to feel relevant you want to feel like a participant in the goings on of activities and events around you. That’s precisely what we are, just by being alive.”

likeafieldmouse:

Alejandro Guijarro - Momentum (2010-12)

“The artist travelled to the great quantum mechanics institutions of the world and, using a large-format camera, photographed blackboards as he found them. Momentum displayed the photographs in life-size. 

Before he walked into a lecture hall Guijarro had no idea what he might find. He began by recording the blackboard with the minimum of interference. No detail of the lecture hall was included, the blackboard frame was removed and we are left with a surface charged with abstract equations. Effectively these are documents. Yet once removed from their institutional beginnings the meaning evolves. The viewer begins to appreciate the equations for their line and form. Color comes into play and the waves created by the blackboard eraser suggest a vast landscape or galactic setting. The formulas appear to illustrate the worlds of Quantum Mechanics. What began as a precise lecture, a description of the physicist’s thought process, is transformed into a canvas open to any number of possibilities.”

1. Cambridge (2011)

2. Stanford (2012)

3. Berkeley I (2012)

4. Berkeley II (2012)

5. Oxford (2011)

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via devincastro)

devincastro:

 i know how you feel.

devincastro:

 i know how you feel.